Latest Posts

Jjalbang (짤방), the Korean Meme

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 07 January 2020

Fundamental Concepts In International Meme Studies: Jjalbang, the Korean Meme

2010's Decade Review, Part 1: The Origin of 2010's Memecultures

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 04 January 2020

The importance of the 2010's to meme history was not in its novelty but its scale. During the 2010's, the world reached a cultural boiling point as the underground spilled out irreversibly into the mainstream and destroyed the boundaries between the two.

Canning The Uncanny Valley In 5 Easy™ Steps

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 31 October 2019

Our goal with this build is simple: Slutty Uncanny Valley Cosplay. We want a costume that captures the uncanny both conceptually and materially. It’s Canning The Uncanny Valley In 5 Easy™ Steps.

Memes as Public Philosophy at PPN

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 29 October 2019

Admins of Trolley Problem Memes recently participated in a Memes as Public Philosophy workshop at the Public Philosophy Network conference.

All Memes Are From the Future

By Seong-Young Her on 12 October 2019

All memes are from the future: the literate memer anticipates that the meme will spread and change in meaning depending on where it gets reposted.

Removed by request of author

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 15 April 2019

Removed by request of author.

The Memetic Bottleneck

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 05 April 2019

Like a panel in a highly networked version of the Infinite Canvas, every meme is both a potential bottleneck and a possible choice. Since the sense that every meme has a preceding meme is essential to the appreciation of memes, the memetic bottleneck works in the inverse direction of the narrative bottleneck, generating potential pasts. To choose a meme to post is to choose which game to play with the audience. More significantly, it is to choose which save file to load up: it's scenario editing of history, conditioned on current mood.

We forced a bot to read Phil101 essays

By Jeremy Cahill, Seong-Young Her on 01 April 2019

You Won't Be(lie)ve What Came Out.